News from the LTER-NCO: Late summer update

Santa Barbara shoreline and wharf header

August 30, 2017

It’s hard to believe the summer is almost gone and the academic year is starting. It was great to see such a strong LTER presence at the ESA Meetings—with a synthesis symposium, an urban LTER symposium, and over 150 talks and posters from across the Network.

The NCO has several important updates to share with the LTER community and site leadership teams that should not wait until the next scheduled News from the LTER-NCO.

LTER All Scientists’ Meeting

At the Network Communications Office, we’ve been working behind the scenes to confirm a date, location, and funding for the 2018 All-Scientists’ Meeting, which will be held:

September 30-October 4, 2018
Asilomar Conference Grounds, Pacific Grove, California

This is a change to the date I announced earlier in the News from the LTER-NCO newsletter. My sincere apologies to those who may have made plans based on the earlier date.

We will be able to fund travel, lodging, and registration for up to 7 people per LTER site, with an emphasis on early-career and under-represented researchers, plus information and education managers. I’ll be contacting Site PI’s later this fall to ask for your list. Meanwhile, please note the dates on your calendars and start brainstorming ideas for talks, synthesis groups, and workshops. We only get to gather the Network every 3 years; let’s make the most of it! If you have ideas for top-notch plenary speakers, please contact Marty Downs or Frank Davis until the planning committee is fully assembled.

New LTER logo

Logos redesigns can be difficult. It’s extraordinarily hard to capture the essence of an organization (particularly one as diverse as the LTER Network) in a single image, but it was time for an update. Working with a professional design team, the Network Communications Office developed several options for the LTER Executive Board to consider and also sought input from across the LTER community. We received over 280 responses to our survey, many with thoughtful and insightful comments.

In the end, we didn’t choose any one of the logos offered in the survey. Rather, we tried to incorporate the intent of the most frequent types of response. The LTER community wanted a logo that felt as warm and inviting as we try to be; that incorporated elements of both science and time; that said ecological research, not technological research…and that had a certain individuality and uniqueness.

The new LTER Network logo—as approved by the LTER executive board and NSF—is shown below. We truly appreciate all the thoughtful and constructive input from the Network. The NCO will begin incorporating it into materials and web sites gradually, with the major shift happening later this fall.

LTER logo 2017

Open Positions

Several key positions are opening up around the Network. Please circulate these announcements to qualified candidates:

To learn about LTER Network-related job openings as they arise, email downs@nceas.ucsb requesting to join opportunities@lternet.edu or visit our opportunities page.

Conferences and Special Issues

The Fall Meeting of the American Geosciences Union will be 11-15 December, 2017 in New Orleans.

The LTER Network Communications Office is gathering a listing of talks and papers, so please include LTER or Long-Term Ecological Research in your affiliation or abstract if at all possible. We’re also working with NSF Public Affairs to bring media attention to some of our most newsworthy stories. To give us a heads-up about your newsworthy paper, contact downs@nceas.ucsb.edu.

Newsletters

LTER Science update, issued monthly, provides brief, accessible summaries of recent science from across the Network. It is designed to inform partners, educators, and the broader ecological community as well as LTER Network scientists. Please share and encourage your colleagues to subscribe.

News from the NCO, issued quarterly, provides regular organizational updates to LTER-associated personnel.

From related organizations:

Ricky’s Atlas: Mapping A Land On Fire

Ricky’s Atlas: Mapping a Land on Fire

Rickys Atlas cover imageRicky’s Atlas: Mapping a Land on Fire

$17.95

BY JUDITH LI
ILLUSTRATED BY M.L. HERRING

In this sequel to Ellie’s Log: Exploring the Forest Where the Great Tree Fell, Ricky Zamora brings his love of map-making and his boundless curiosity to the arid landscapes east of the Cascade Mountains. He arrives during a wild thunderstorm, and watches his family and their neighbors scramble to deal with a wildfire sparked by lightning. Joined by his friend Ellie, he sees how plants, animals, and people adjust to life with wildfires.

While hiking across a natural prairie, climbing up a fire tower, and studying historical photos and maps, Ricky and Ellie learn about the role of fire in shaping the landscape of the eastern semi-arid plateau. They experience the scary days of wildfire in progress, explore a gritty site after a wildfire, and discover how some plants and animals depend on fire to survive.

Color pen-and-ink drawings accompany the text and vividly illustrate plants, animals, and events encountered in this exciting summer adventure. With his friend Ellie, Ricky creates a brightly colored diary of the fire, with maps, timelines, and sketches of what they see in this fire-prone land. Ricky’s notebook about his summer visit to his uncle’s ranch becomes an atlas of fire ecology, weather patterns, and life in the rain shadow.

Upper elementary kids will enjoy the mixture of amazing adventures with actual historical, physical, and ecological data about the region. Woven into the story are the small pleasures of ranch life, intriguing histories of Native Americans and early settlers, and almost unbelievable views of ancient fossils. Ricky and Ellie’s explorations, accompanied by their hand-written notes, introduce readers to a very special landscape and history east of the mountains.

Seeking The Wolf Tree

Seeking the Wolf Tree

cover image for seeking the wolf treeSEEKING THE WOLF TREE

$15.95

BY NATALIE CLEAVITT
ILLUSTRATED BY MARJORIE LEGGITT

Old-time New England foresters coined the term “wolf tree” for trees they saw as having the ability to “eat” the sun and nutrients and prevent the growth of other trees. Today, however, we understand how wolf trees benefit wildlife. Join Aurora and Orion as they search for a wolf tree in the in the 3,160 hectare Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, looking for such clues as a large trunk, low branches, wildlife activity, and nearby smaller trees.

Supplemental teaching materials and other resources are available on the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study web site.

The Autumn Calf

The Autumn Calf

Autumn Calf cover imageTHE AUTUMN CALF

$15.95

BY JILL HAUKOS
ILLUSTRATED BY JOYCE MIHRAN TURLEY

Most bison calves are born in mid-spring. However, one August morning at the Konza Prairie Biological Station near Manhattan, Kansas, a new little orange-coated bison is discovered within the herd. The people who manage the herd become concerned about her welfare, as they know that since she is so little she faces many challenges to survive the winter in the tall-grass prairie of the Flint Hills.

Will she survive the harsh winter so she can learn to munch fresh new grass with her mother in the spring? This beautifully illustrated book takes the reader through a year on the tall-grass prairie with the bison herd, where we learn about bison management practices, the local plants and animals that grow and live in the ecosystem, and the importance of controlled burning to keep the native prairie grasses healthy and remove invasive species.

Ellie’s Log: Exploring The Forest Where The Great Tree Fell

Ellie’s Log: Exploring the Forest Where the Great Tree Fell

Ellie's Log cover imageELLIE’S LOG: EXPLORING THE FOREST WHERE THE GREAT TREE FELL

$16.95

BY JUDITH L. LI
ILLUSTRATED BY M.L. HERRING

After a huge tree crashes to the ground during a winter storm, ten-year-old Ellie and her new friend, Ricky, explore the forest where Ellie lives. Together, they learn how trees provide habitat for plants and animals high in the forest canopy, down among mossy old logs, and deep in the pools of a stream. The plants, insects, birds, and mammals they discover come to life in colored pen-and-ink drawings.

An engaging blend of science and storytelling, Ellie’s Log also features:

  • Pages from Ellie’s own field notebook, which provide a model for recording observations in nature
  • Ellie’s advice to readers for keeping a field notebook
  • Ellie’s book recommendations
  • Online resources for readers and teachers—including a Teacher’s Guide—are available at the companion website: ellieslog.org.

The forest and animals described in Ellie’s Log are based on those found at the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest in the Oregon Cascades, where researchers have been learning about forests and streams for decades.

Kupe And The Corals

Kupe and the Corals

Kupe and the Corals cover image

KUPE AND THE CORALS

$15.95

BY JACQUELINE L. PADILLA-GAMIÑO
ILLUSTRATED BY MARJORIE LEGGITT

One night while young Kupe is fishing with his father, he observes an astonishing event, thousands and thousands of tiny “bubbles” rising to the surface of the waters in the lagoon near where he lives. Kupe visits with an elder from his village and a scientist from the nearby marine lab in an attempt to learn more about what he has seen. Kupe then goes on to learn more about how corals grow and the importance of corals in building the reefs that provide homes for all of the other wonderful animals that he sees while snorkeling in the lagoon.

Bi-lingual paperback versions available: English/Spanish, English/Hawaiian, French/Tahitian, and English/Tahitian, all $8.95.

And The Tide Comes In

And the Tide Comes In

cover image for "and the Tide Comes in"AND THE TIDE COMES IN: EXPLORING A COASTAL SALT MARSH

$9.95

BY MERRYL ALBER
ILLUSTRATED BY JOYCE MIHRAN TURLEY

This book is a narrative told from the point of view of a young girl who is showing her visiting cousin a coastal salt marsh. The children visit the marsh every day for four days, slowly building their knowledge of the ecosystem. As they make their way through the tall marsh grass, the two children slip and slide on marsh mud, discover clusters of ribbed mussels at the base of the grass, and watch as fiddler crabs skitter from burrow to burrow around the edge of a creek. Representative of intertidal marshes throughout the world, the coastal salt marsh described in this book is typically shared by both land and marine mammals, presenting a unique ecosystem at the water’s edge.

Sea Secrets

Sea Secrets

cover image sea secretsSEA SECRETS: TINY CLUES TO A BIG MYSTERY

$16.95

BY MARY M. CERULLO AND BETH E. SIMMONS
ILLUSTRATED BY KIRSTEN CARLSON

Journey across the Pacific Ocean and investigate the mystery connecting three different animals from the California Current to the polar waters west of the Antarctic Peninsula. Become an ocean detective and discover the connection between a seabird, whale, and a penguin; and maybe you’ll uncover the sea secret that links them all. This book invites young readers to explore ocean ecosystems and their food webs. Field sketches, watercolors, and photographs combine to reveal the clues.

My Water Comes From The Rocky Mountains

My Water Comes from the Rocky Mountains

My Water Comes From The Rocky Mountains

MY WATER COMES FROM THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS

$16.95

BY TIFFANY FOURMENT
ILLUSTRATED BY DOROTHY EMERLING

This book introduces children to the nation’s watershed, the Continental Divide, and how snowmelt forms the headwaters of the rivers and streams that bring life to the land below all along the front range of the Rocky Mountains. The entire water cycle is described from evaporation to glacier formation and the various life zones that water runs through on its way from alpine tundra to prairie are detailed in exquisite drawings.

Available in both hardcover and paperback.

One Night In The Everglades

One Night in the Everglades

ONE NIGHT IN THE EVERGLADESONE NIGHT IN THE EVERGLADES

$15.95

BY LAUREL LARSEN PH.D.
ILLUSTRATED BY JOYCE MIHRAN TURLEY

Follow two scientists as they spend a night in the Everglades collecting water samples, photographing wildlife, and sloshing through marshes in an attempt to understand this mysterious ecosystem. Part of a long-term effort to return the Everglades to a natural state after a century of development, the scientists try to figure out what the “river of grass” was like prior to human settlement. Along the way, they deal with razor-sharp sawgrass and alligators and turtles and are even surprised by the sudden presence of what is known in the Everglades as a “frog gigger”—one who hunts and collects frogs for food!

Also available in a Spanish language version, Una Noche en los Everglades.

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