Dr. Brandon Bestelmeyer

Dr. Brandon Bestelmeyer

portrait of Dr. Brandon BestelmeyerBrandon Bestelmeyer is research leader and ecologist at the USDA Agricultural Research Service, Jornada Experimental Range and a co-PI of the Jornada Basin Long-Term Ecological Research site at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces, New Mexico. His research focuses on tipping points, strategies to promote resilience, and restoration in rangeland ecosystems. This work emphasize collaborations with governmental and non-governmental organizations to use ecological science in rangeland decision-making, including the Natural Resources Conservation Service, Bureau of Land Management, the Malpai Borderlands Group, the Mongolian government, and agricultural agencies in Argentina. He obtained an M.S. in Zoology and Ph.D in Ecology at Colorado State University and Bachelor’s degrees in Biological Sciences and Applied Ecology at University of California, Irvine.

Dr. Karen McGlathery

Dr. Karen McGlathery

portrait of Dr. Karen McGlatheryKaren McGlathery is a Professor of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia.  A specialist on effects of environmental change, including climate, sea-level rise, eutrophication and species invasions in coastal marine ecosystems, she has co-authored over 80 articles in journals including Nature, Limnology and Oceanography, Marine Ecology Progress Series, and Oceanography.  Her most recent research at the Virginia Coast Reserve Long Term Ecological Research (VCR LTER) program focuses on the role of large-scale habitat restoration in the provision of ecosystem services, including carbon sequestration.  In addition to Virginia’s Eastern Shore, the graduate students in her lab have worked in coastal systems in New England, Florida, Bermuda, New Zealand and Mozambique.

McGlathery is an Associate Editor of the journal Ecosystems, and has served as a Guest Editor for the journal Oceanography.  She was a member of the National Science Foundation Committee of Visitors on Centers of Excellence for Research in Science and Technology.

McGlathery received her B.S. from Connecticut College and her Ph.D. from Cornell University.  Before coming to UVA in 1996, she was a Research Associate at the University of Copenhagen and the National Environmental Research Institute in Denmark. Since 2004, McGlathery has served as Director of the Virginia Coast Reserve Long Term Ecological Research program, based at UVA’s Anheuser-Busch Coastal Research Center on Virginia’s Eastern Shore.  

Dr. Peter M. Groffman

Dr. Peter M. Groffman

portrait of Dr. Peter GroffmanPeter M. Groffman is a Professor at the City University of New York Advanced Science Research Center and Brooklyn College Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, and a Senior Research Fellow at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies.  He has research interests in ecosystem, soil, landscape and microbial ecology, with a focus on carbon and nitrogen dynamics. Groffman is chair of the Science Council of the U.S. National Science Foundation funded Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) network and a participant in LTER projects in Baltimore (urban) and New Hampshire (northern hardwood forests).  Specific recent research efforts include studies of nitrogen dynamics in urban watersheds, lawns, riparian zones and forests, winter climate change effects on nutrient cycling in forests, calcium/nitrogen/carbon interactions in forests, and the effects of exotic earthworm invasion on soil nitrogen and carbon cycling. Groffman was a Convening Lead Author for the 2013 U.S. National Climate Assessment Chapter on Ecosystems, Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services and a lead author for the Second (Wetlands) and Third (North America) Assessment Reports of the Intergovernmental Program on Climate Change (IPCC).   

Dr. Charles T. Driscoll

Dr. Charles T. Driscoll

portrait of Dr. Charles DriscollCharles T. Driscoll is a Distinguished and University Professor at Syracuse University.  Driscoll’s scholarly work addresses the effects of disturbance on forest, freshwater and marine ecosystems, including air pollution (acid and mercury deposition), land-use, and climate change. Current research focuses on: recovery of eastern forest watersheds from elevated acidic deposition; atmospheric deposition, watershed and surface water transport and transformations, and biotic exposure of mercury; co-benefits of carbon dioxide emissions controls from power plants; ecosystem restoration; and ecosystem response to changing climate. He has been a principal investigator of the Hubbard Brook Long-Term Ecosystem Research project, and is currently a co-investigator. Driscoll has testified at Congressional and state legislative committee hearings, and served on many local, national and international committees.  He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

Dr. Christopher J. Kucharik

Dr. Christopher J. Kucharik

portrait of Dr. Christopher KucharikChris Kucharik is a Professor in the Department of Agronomy and The Nelson Institute Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  He is affiliated with the Wisconsin Energy Institute, the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, the Center for Climatic Research, and Freshwater and Marine Sciences.  He is a member of the Working Groups Council for the Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impacts (WICCI), and serves as co-chair for the WICCI Agriculture Working Group.  His research program is largely interdisciplinary, incorporating field work on cropping systems ecology and ecosystem modeling in a framework that is geared towards understanding the impacts of global change on ecosystem services.  He is a co-PI of the North Temperate Lakes LTER and recently served as lead PI on a NSF Water Sustainability and Climate project based in the Yahara watershed of southern Wisconsin.

Dr. Michelle Mack

Dr. Michelle Mack

portrait of Dr. Michelle MackMichelle Mack is a Professor in the Center for Ecosystem Science and Society at Northern Arizona University. She is an ecologist who studies the impacts of climate-sensitive disturbances, such as wildfire, on the carbon dynamics of arctic and boreal ecosystems. Her work includes two decades of field research at the NSF-funded Boreal and Arctic Longterm Ecological Research sites.  She has produced more than 100 peer-reviewed publications in high-profile journals such as Nature and Science. She graduated from the Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington, with a concurrent BS-BA in Biology and Literature, and received a PhD in Integrative Biology from the University of California-Berkeley. Her arctic experiences started when she held an NSF postdoctoral-fellowship at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. She spent 12 years on the Biology faculty at the University of Florida before moving to Northern Arizona University.

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