July LTER Science Update Newsletter

July LTER Science Update Newsletter

In July, the Science Update Newsletter covers:

  • How does culture affect the process of ecological homogenization in residential landscapes?
  • Is interior Alaska headed toward a landscape of shrubs and grasses?
  • Could the threat of predators serve as a safe and effective form of pest control?
  • How do sharks eating from the same territory reduce competition?
  • As alpine environments shift from mosses and lichens to plants—how does the change affect soil microbes?

Subscribe to stay up to date on the latest news on long-term science from across the country, and please share with colleagues and stakeholders.

May/June LTER Science Update Newsletter

May/June LTER Science Update Newsletter

In May and June, the Science Update Newsletter covers:

  • laboratory findings, by Santa Barbara Coastal LTER and other researchers, that show the sensitivity of sea urchin fertilization success to ocean acidification, published in Ecology and Evolution;
  • public preferences of cultural ecosystem services, amassed by researchers at Coweeta LTER;
  • from Luquillo LTER, long-term patterns of arthropod abundance and diversity in response to repeated hurricane disturbances;
  • in Ecosystems, benefits of capitalizing on big data in ecosystem science.

Subscribe to stay up to date on the latest news on long-term science from across the country, and please share with colleagues and stakeholders.

April LTER Science Update Newsletter

April LTER Science Update Newsletter

In April, the Science Update Newsletter covers:

  • a perspective piece in Ecology Letters, by NTL and other researchers, on the history and opportunities for the field of macrosystems ecology;
  • a comparison of the impacts of grazing and fire history on plant water use and niche structure—from researchers at the KNZ LTER;
  • in Ecosystem Health and Sustainability, an application of ecological disturbance theory to urban systems;
  • a comparison of the ways that hydrologic regimes and phosphorous availability affect algal diversity in the Everglades and Botswana’s Okavango Delta;
  • a report on the recent LTER-NEON Synergies workshop

Subscribe to stay up to date on the latest news on long-term science from across the country, and please share with colleagues and stakeholders.

March LTER Science Update Newsletter

In March, the Science Update Newsletter covers:

  • Announcements of three new LTER sites and the NSF symposium
  • a HFR-LTER paper in Ecology on the influence of excess nitrogen on fungal decomposition (spoiler — it slows decomposition)
  • a BES-LTER paper in Landscape Ecology on evolving paradigms of urban ecology
  • a KBS-LTER study, published in Royal Society Open Science, on firefly phenology under changing climate
  • an NTL-LTER study of invasive earthworms, published in Biological Invasions
  • A synthesis paper, published in Global Change Biology, temperature sensitivity of little decomposition in streams

Subscribe to stay up to date on the latest news on long-term science from across the country, and please share with colleagues and stakeholders.

Video Abstracts: Where, When, Why, And How?

Video abstracts: where, when, why, and how?

Twemoji 1f4f9The NCO will host a discussion of video abstracts and other forms of video shorts on November 17 at 10 a.m. Pacific time (11 a.m. Mountain/12 Noon Central/1 p.m. Eastern).

The aim is to explore the popularity and utility of video abstracts, consider the advantages and disadvantages of several competing formats, and offer some resources and ideas for how to move forward. The discussion is open to any LTER community members who are interested, but pre-registration is required. Please review the video resources page before the meeting.

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